Album

Release Format Tracks Date Country Label Catalog# Barcode
Official
Come Taste the Band 12" Vinyl 9 Purple Records (releases 1971-1979 , currently sub of EMI) TPSA 7515 [none]
Come Taste the Band 12" Vinyl 9 Warner Bros. Records (“WB” logo, with or without “records” beneath or on banner across) P-10066W [none]
Come Taste the Band 12" Vinyl 9 EMI Electrola (more likely the company trademark of EMI Electrola GmbH than an imprint), Purple Records (releases 1971-1979 , currently sub of EMI) 1C 064-97 044 [none]
Come Taste the Band CD 9 Warner Bros. Records (“WB” logo, with or without “records” beneath or on banner across) 20P2-2610
Come Taste the Band CD 9 EMI (EMI Records, since 1972) CDMID 166162 5099916616226
Come Taste the Band CD 9 EMI (EMI Records, since 1972) CDP 7 94032 2 5099916616226
Come Taste the Band CD 10 Metal Blade Records 9 26454-2 075992645423
Come Taste the Band CD 9 EMI (EMI Records, since 1972) CDP 7 94032-2, CZ 343 0077779403226
Come Taste the Band CD 9 Warner Bros. Records (“WB” logo, with or without “records” beneath or on banner across) WPCR-874 4943674087426
Come Taste the Band CD 9 EMI (EMI Records, since 1972) CDFA 3318, CDP 7 94032 2 0077779403226
Come Taste the Band CD 9 Purple Records (releases 1971-1979 , currently sub of EMI), Warner Bros. Records (“WB” logo, with or without “records” beneath or on banner across) WPCR-75040 4943674056491
Come Taste the Band CD 10 Friday Music 829421-10582-4 829421105824
Come Taste the Band SHM-CD 9 Warner Bros. Records (“WB” logo, with or without “records” beneath or on banner across) WPCR-13117 4943674083282
Come Taste the Band (35th anniversary edition) 2×CD 14 + 17 EMI (EMI Records, since 1972) TPSX7515
Come Taste the Band (35th anniversary edition) 2×CD 10 + 12 EMI (EMI Records, since 1972), Purple Records (relaunched 1999) 50999 647866 2 9, TPSX 7515 5099964786629
Come Taste the Band CD 9 Warner Bros. Records (“WB” logo, with or without “records” beneath or on banner across) WPCR-80222 4943674211494

Relationships

included in: The Complete Albums 1970–1976
Allmusic: http://www.allmusic.com/album/mw0000204325 [info]
Discogs: https://www.discogs.com/master/2884 [info]
Wikidata: Q745834 [info]
Wikipedia: en: Come Taste the Band [info]
reviews: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/g8fd [info]

CritiqueBrainz Reviews

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Come their tenth studio album Deep Purple were sounding tired. After seven years and four line-ups, their collective creative energy was just about spent. Nothing that a couple of months in the sun couldn't have cured, perhaps, but that's not how the rock machine rolls. When you hit paydirt - as Purple had, and then some - you just keep pushing whatever the cost. As it turned out, Come Taste the Band would be the last Deep Purple album for almost a decade.

It certainly wasn't meant to be that way. Originally released in 1975, Come Taste the Band heralded the arrival of new guitarist Tommy Bolin. The former James Gang man had been drafted in to replace founding axeman Ritchie Blackmore, who'd finally quit in protest at the increasingly funky, soulful style Purple had been adopting since vocalist David Coverdale and bassist/vocalist Glenn Hughes had replaced Ian Gillan and Roger Glover two years earlier. Bolin's role was to rejuvenate the band but the results saw them drift further into commercial waters and ever farther from the trademark Purple sound.

Although both the band's previous two albums, Burn and Stormbringer (both released in 1974), had introduced the aforementioned funk and soul courtesy of Coverdale and Hughes, Blackmore's continued presence ensured that a certain amount of hard rock meat remained on Purple's increasingly bare bones. With Blackmore gone, the band completed their transformation into an entirely different beast. Consequently, denim-clad devotees of hard-hitting Purple albums such as In Rock and Machine Head would find little to like.

Offering the likes of driving opener Comin' Home, raunchy blues rockers like I Need Love, excellent vocals from both Coverdale and Hughes and some stellar fretwork from Bolin, Come Taste the Band is far from a disaster, particularly on its own terms. The jazzy interludes and funky breaks which Blackmore had condemned as "shoeshine music" make for breezy easy listening. There's even a whiff of the sex which Coverdale later made a virtual art form with Whitesnake. As a Deep Purple album, however, it's underpowered and way too relaxed for its own good. A harmless little sparkler where once there was a ton of TNT.