The Who Sell Out

~ Release group by The Who

Album

Release Format Tracks Date Country Label Catalog# Barcode
Official
The Who Sell Out 12" Vinyl 13 Track Record 612 002
The Who Sell Out CD 13 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) P28P 25084 4988005043221
The Who Sell Out CD 12 MCA Records (1967–2003; name as in imprint from 1972–1990) MCABD-31332, MCAD-31332 076731133225
The Who Sell Out CD 23 MCA Records (1967–2003; name as in imprint from 1972–1990) MCAD-11268 008811126827
The Who Sell Out CD 23 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) 527 759-2 731452775924
The Who Sell Out CD 23 MCA Records Canada (1970–1995) MCASD 11268 008811126827
The Who Sell Out CD 12 MCA Records (1967–2003; name as in imprint from 1972–1990) MCAD-31332 076743133220
The Who Sell Out CD 13 Universal International (release must say "制作:Universal International" AND have no logos other than "Universal Music") UICP-93002 4988005478214
The Who Sell Out (deluxe edition) 2×CD 30 + 23 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) 5315336 600753153369
The Who Sell Out (Box Set) 2×SHM-CD 30 + 23 Universal International (release must say "制作:Universal International" AND have no logos other than "Universal Music") UICY-94048/9 4988005554987
The Who Sell Out SHM-SACD 26 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) UIGY-9092 4988005711731
The Who Sell Out (mono version) Digital Media 16 Geffen Records 602537945924
The Who Sell Out (stereo version) Digital Media 30 Geffen Records
The Who Sell Out CD 12
Bootleg
The Who Sell Out (mono edition) (unknown) 27 Polyboy WHO-67

Relationships

associated singles/EPs: I Can See for Miles
covers: Petra Haden Sings: The Who Sell Out by Petra Haden
part of: Rolling Stone: 500 Greatest Albums of All Time: 2012 edition (number: 115)
Allmusic: http://www.allmusic.com/album/mw0000652659 [info]
Discogs: https://www.discogs.com/master/68445 [info]
Wikidata: Q844051 [info]
Wikipedia: en: The Who Sell Out [info]
other databases: https://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/the_who/the_who_sell_out/ [info]
reviews: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/gpzf [info]

CritiqueBrainz Reviews

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Whatever the arty origins of their auto-destruction stage act may have been, the resulting column inches from those exploding drum kits and wrecked amplifiers demonstrated that The Who were one of the most media-savvy bands around. Their grasp of the importance of image comes as no particular surprise given Mod culture's attention to personal grooming and having the correct look at all times. Pete Townshend once said that the idea of interspersing the tracks of The Who Sell Out with radio jingles came from a desire to disguise what he felt was a weak collection of songs. Thus the iconic cover and the audio adverts conspired to become a satirical swipe at rampant consumerism - hey presto, a concept album of sorts. Well, almost.

Ironically, the album is an advert of sorts for their follow-up record, containing as it does, many of the seeds that would flower into Tommy. Townshend was partially right about some it not being up to scratch. John Entwhistle's "Mingy Stingy" and the psychedelic "Armenia City In The Sky" (written by Speedy Keene, later of Thunderclap Newman and Motorhead producer, trivia fans), as well as his own "Mary Anne With The Shaky Hand" and "Our Love Was" may well be innocuous tosh but tosh nevertheless.

Things get on firmer Townshend ground with the tongue-in-cheek tale about the nature of masculinity, "Tattoo" which has such a glorious uplifting melody that Roger Daltry could've sang lines from the Yellow Pages and it would've been just as spine-tingling. The plaintive "Sunshine" (with its hint of "Pinball Wizard") is an attractive enough love song, and like "Rael 1" - the album's only true concept track - shows his keenness to extend his craft and serve notice of the shape of things to come. Generally though, things are pretty tame by The Who's standards, and lacking stylistic coherence.

The exception is "I Can See For Miles." Its glowering presence overshadows everything else here. The rumbling salvos of Keith Moon's tom-toms brilliantly herald the cathartic release of the song's pulsating, obsessive chorus. A classic chunk of Who and a highpoint in 60s pop.