Album

Release Format Tracks Date Country Label Catalog# Barcode
Official
The Stone Roses 12" Vinyl 11 Silvertone Records ORE LP 502 5013705116513
The Stone Roses CD 11 Silvertone Records ORE CD 502 5013705116520
The Stone Roses CD 12 Silvertone Records 1184-2-J 012414118424
The Stone Roses Cassette 12 Silvertone Records 1184-4-J
The Stone Roses 12" Vinyl 12 Silvertone Records 1184-1-J
The Stone Roses CD 11 Silvertone Records ZD74139 0035627413926
The Stone Roses CD 11 Silvertone Records 29B2-47
The Stone Roses CD 13 RCA (RCA Records: simple ‘RCA’ or 'RCA' with lightning bolt in circle), Silvertone Records J2 1184 1241411842
The Stone Roses CD 13 Silvertone Records 1184-2-JX 1241411842
The Stone Roses Cassette 13 Silvertone Records 1184-4-JX 012414118448
The Stone Roses 12" Vinyl 12 BMG (the former Bertelsmann Music Group, defunct since 2004-08-05; for releases dated 2008 and later, use "BMG Rights Management"), RCA (RCA Records: simple ‘RCA’ or 'RCA' with lightning bolt in circle), Silvertone Records 1184-1-J RE 1 1241411841
The Stone Roses CD 13 Silvertone Records ORE ZCD 502 5013705116520
The Stone Roses 2×12" Vinyl 5 + 6 Silvertone Records ORE ZLP 502 5013705901911
The Stone Roses CD 13 Silvertone Records 01241 44120 2 012414412027
The Stone Roses (anniversary edition) 2×CD 11 + 4 Silvertone Records 0591242 5013705912429
The Stone Roses CD 11 Silvertone Records 8287 653971 2 828765397124
The Stone Roses 12" Vinyl + 7" Vinyl 11 + 1 Silvertone Records 88697546111
The Stone Roses CD 12 Silvertone Records 88697430852 886974308522
The Stone Roses (20th Anniversary Legacy Edition) 2×CD + DVD 12 + 20 + 18 Silvertone Records 88697430902 886974309024
The Stone Roses: 1989–2009 3×CD + 3×12" Vinyl + USB Flash Drive 11 + 13 + 20 + 11 + 5 + 8 + 48 Silvertone Records 88697430302 886975770922
The Stone Roses (20th Anniversary special edition) 2×CD + DVD 12 + 20 + 18 Silvertone Records 88697560622 886975606221
The Stone Roses 2×CD 11 + 13 Silvertone Records BVCP 40121~2 4988017673683
The Stone Roses 12" Vinyl 11 Silvertone Records 88843041991 888430419919
The Stone Roses 2×12" Vinyl 5 + 6 Modern Classic Recordings MCR 914 826853091411

Relationships

associated singles/EPs: Elephant Stone
Made of Stone
part of: Uncut: The 100 Greatest Debut Albums (2006) (number: 4)
Rolling Stone: 500 Greatest Albums of All Time: 2012 edition (number: 498)
Allmusic: http://www.allmusic.com/album/mw0000653335 [info]
Discogs: https://www.discogs.com/master/12458 [info]
Wikidata: Q300932 [info]
lyrics page: http://lyrics.wikia.com/The_Stone_Roses:The_Stone_Roses_(1989) [info]
other databases: http://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/the_stone_roses/the_stone_roses/ [info]
http://www.musik-sammler.de/album/78132 [info]
reviews: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/q6rg [info]

CritiqueBrainz Reviews

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Manchester at the end of the 80s was caught between two schools of musical thought. Still in thrall to the legacy left behind by both Factory records and the recently-departed Smiths it was also in the grip of early club culture.The odiously-named Madchester scene was just on the horizon. No band summed up this schism as well as the Roses.

Originally a punk-loving, bandana and leather trouser-sporting bunch of rowdy locals with a following and a Martin Hannett-produced flop to their names, they finally re-emerged with Johnny Marr's chiming Byrd-isms married to new bassist Mani's loping funk on "Sally Cinnamon". Guitarist John Squire now felt confident enough to let his influences shine and Ian Brown had progressed from raw shouts to Mancunian cool. The sound was sorted. Now for some top, banging album action.

John Leckie, producer for XTC, George Harrison and Simple Minds, was brought in as producer and finally the band released the prequel to the debut album, "Elephant Stone", a psychedelic raver which (along with "Fool's Gold") was included in the re-issued two-disc version of the album. When it did arrive it wasn't to the universal acclaim that it now garners as 'best debut album of all time'. Instead it was a quieter word-of mouth process that, within the year had put the band on top of the new Manchester scene and led to Spike Island and all its attendant problems.

On first listen, *The Stone Roses *is a strangely old-fashioned album. Brown's multi-tracked vocals (he was never a strong singer) mix pleasantly with Squire's chiming Rickenbacker to produce a very mellow, 60s West Coast vibe. But if you get insisde the heart of songs like "I Wanna Be Adored" and "I Am The Resurrection" there's that unmistakeable swagger and defiance that was to prove such a template for Oasis a few years later.

It's also this strange friction between old and new that makes this album so durable. Certainly it was Squire who took the band into essentially 'freak-out' territory, especially on the wah-wah'n'drum work out at the end of "I Am The Resurrection", and it was he who sank the follow-up with his adoration of Jimmy Page. But as an accurate picture of how working class hedonism fused dance and rock in the dying days of the 80s, this album is unbeatable.