Annotation

There are several versions and remasters of this album containing the same titles, but in alternative mixes.
The Verve edition of 1986 is a remastered re-issue with subtly different tracks to the 1967 release.
The 1996 re-release went back to the original mastertapes and artwork, although the banana could sadly not be peeled slowly. ;)

Annotation last modified on 2012-10-18 22:14 .

Album

Release Format Tracks Date Country Label Catalog# Barcode
Official
The Velvet Underground & Nico 12" Vinyl 11 Verve (aka “Verve Records”, US jazz) V6-5008 [none]
The Velvet Underground & Nico 12" Vinyl 11 Verve (aka “Verve Records”, US jazz) V-5008 [none]
The Velvet Underground & Nico 12" Vinyl 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) 2391 323 [none]
The Velvet Underground & Nico 12" Vinyl 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) SPELP 20
The Velvet Underground & Nico 12" Vinyl 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) SPELP 73
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Verve (aka “Verve Records”, US jazz) 823 290-2 042282329028
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Verve (aka “Verve Records”, US jazz) 823 290-2 042282329028
The Velvet Underground & Nico ('Polydor Popular CD Nice Price Series' budget re-issue) CD 11 Polydor (Japanese domestic releases only!) POCP-1841 4988005068712
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) 31453 1250 2 731453125025
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) 531 250 2 731453125025
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 12 Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab UDCD 695 015775169524
The Velvet Underground & Nico (deluxe edition) 2×CD 16 + 15 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) 314 589 624-2 0731458958826
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) B0011717-02 602517804272
The Velvet Underground & Nico 2×CD 16 + 15 Verve (aka “Verve Records”, US jazz) UICY-93894, UICY-93895 4988005545923
The Velvet Underground & Nico (Rarities Edition: Essential Collector's Tracks) CD 15 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) B001387402 602527293073
The Velvet Underground & Nico SHM-SACD 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) UIGY-9028 4988005614407
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation), Universal (plain logo: "Universal") 3715319 602537153190
The Velvet Underground & Nico (45th anniversary edition) 2×CD 16 + 15 Universal UMC 3705468
The Velvet Underground & Nico (45th anniversary super deluxe edition) 6×CD 16 + 15 + 10 + 15 + 5 + 4 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation), UMe (imprint of Universal Music Enterprises) B0016946-02 602537054695
The Velvet Underground & Nico CD 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) B0017493-02 602537153190
The Velvet Underground & Nico 6×SHM-CD 16 + 15 + 10 + 15 + 5 + 4 Polydor (Japanese domestic releases only!), UMe (imprint of Universal Music Enterprises) UICY-75343/8 4988005730817
The Velvet Underground & Nico (45th anniversary edition) Digital Media 11 Polydor (worldwide imprint, see annotation) [none]
The Velvet Underground & Nico Blu-ray 11 Verve (aka “Verve Records”, US jazz) V6-5008 600753429976
The Velvet Underground & Nico 12" Vinyl 11 AUNJ 9005
Bootleg
The Velvet Underground & Nico Vinyl 9

Relationships

associated singles/EPs: All Tomorrow’s Parties / I’ll Be Your Mirror by The Velvet Underground and Nico
Sunday Morning / Femme Fatale
covers: The Kettering Vampires Perform Nico & The Velvet Underground by Alan Jenkins
part of: Uncut: The 100 Greatest Debut Albums (2006) (number: 1)
Rolling Stone: 500 Greatest Albums of All Time: 2012 edition (number: 13)
Allmusic: http://www.allmusic.com/album/mw0001955423 [info]
Discogs: https://www.discogs.com/master/35276 [info]
Wikidata: Q259667 [info]
other databases: https://rateyourmusic.com/release/album/the_velvet_underground_nico/the_velvet_underground_and_nico_f1/ [info]
https://www.musik-sammler.de/album/81618/ [info]
reviews: http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/fq4h [info]
http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/reviews/h26m [info]

CritiqueBrainz Reviews

There are 2 reviews on CritiqueBrainz. You can also write your own.

Most Recent

Famously ignored upon its release in 1967, The Velvet Underground & Nico's landmark debut has since become regarded as one of the greatest and most influential rock albums of all time. First released on CD in 1986, it then appeared as part of the career-spanning Peel Slowly and See box set in 1995, followed by a deluxe edition in 2002.

And that, you'd think, would be that. But here it is again, in its most comprehensively expanded form yet, and in various formats each vying for your wallet.

Unfortunately, its most telling detail isn't to be found in the hitherto hidden textures of the newly remastered mono mix, nor in the various alternate versions of familiar classics. It's in the fact that, so eager were they to milk its enduring legacy, Universal Music/Polydor couldn't wait just a few more years for the more commonly celebrated 50th anniversary.

Tainted by a cynical and exploitative pall, it transforms an uncompromising artistic statement into a mammoth, cash-gobbling monster. You wait for The Man long enough, he'll catch up with you in the end.

So what's on offer? The limited-edition six-CD box set features stereo and mono mixes, plus Nico's VU-assisted debut album Chelsea Girl, all newly remastered from the original tapes by VU reissue maestro Bill Levenson.

It also boasts the first official release of The Scepter Studios sessions, featuring early takes and mixes, a Factory rehearsal (including Nico's aborted take on There She Goes Again) and an oft-bootlegged live performance from 1966. Levenson's stellar work aside, it's for fanatics only; how many versions of All Tomorrow's Parties does anyone really need?

The two-CD edition features the stereo version alongside the Scepter sessions. So if you want to enjoy Levenson's superior, rawer mono remaster, then the box set is your only option. See what they did there?

It's galling that such a deathless masterpiece - it still sounds extraordinary - should be endlessly repackaged for rank commercial gain. Still, roll on the 47th anniversary giant inflatable banana edition with holographic Lou Reed 3D commentary.

Most Popular

Brian Eno once stated that, despite hardly anyone buying this album on its release, everyone that did buy it seemed to have formed a band. Ladies and gentlemen, we are talking about one of the three most influential albums of all time (what are the other two? You work it out, dear reader). Without this slice of plastic there would have been no glam rock, no krautrock and no punk. If Lou and John hadn't decided to ditch their respective careers in order to blur the boundary between pop and avant garde there would have been no Stooges, Can, David Bowie (as we know him) or Roxy Music. Oh, and The Jesus And Mary Chain would have had no career whatsoever. Which is why this deluxe treatment is long overdue and entirely welcome.

The tale of how this masterpiece even made it into the racks has long since passed into the realms of legend - Andy Warhol spotting them at a New York club and offering to produce them (i.e. putting up the money). The way he foisted Teutonic femme fatale Nico onto the band and the way she proceeded to set Lou against John (by sleeping with and rejecting them both). The year-long delay before the album made it to the shops (by which time Warhol had lost interest) - It all boils down to one inescapable fact. Even by 1967 this was still frighteningly original music that had as little to do with pop or rock as Frank Zappa's first album, *Freak Out *(which, interestingly enough, was also produced by Tom Wilson). For the very first time a rock band were writing songs that were utterly nihilistic and seemed to come from the very flipside of the psychedelic love-fest that was (if you believed the hype) occurring everywhere else. Here was a group that knew of the depths of perversity to which people could sink and frankly sounded as if they didn't care either. Songs like "Heroin" or "Waiting For The Man" didn't simply hint, they graphically laid out the stories of degradation as if daring you to turn away.

It was all wrapped in a musical package that was as stark as its subjects. Reed's oddly scraped 'ostrich' guitar, Cale's droning viola and not least Mo Tucker's almost moronic proto-motorik drumming all added up to a canvas that even when set behind Nico's bored drone couldn't fail to alarm, if all you'd been listening to was the Beatles and their ilk. This release sees the addition, not only of the rare mono mix but the tracks recorded for Nico's first solo outing Chelsea Girls, with the band backing her. Strangely these extras serve to demonstrate, as with tracks such as "Sunday Morning" or "There She Goes Again" that the Velvets could always revert to pop parameters if needed. They just didn't want to.

Offerings as extreme as "The Black Angels Death Song" or "European Son" were always going to be the moments that really remained in the minds of those brave enough to experience this album. Not many did and unbelievably it remained a semi-obscurity long after its release, with only rock scribes and musicians enhancing its reputation by word of mouth. Acceptance as a 'classic' hasn't diminished its awesome power to shock and provoke one jot. If you've never heard it, your life will be changed. If you've already got it, it's still an essential purchase. A monument to the evil that men (and women) do.